SMHFF Short Film Youth Competition 2021

SMHFF Short Film Youth Competition is back for the second year! In 2020, we saw over 160 youths participate in the inaugural competition. Through the Festival’s platform, and multiple local and international collaborations, #SMHFFYouth have reached over 20,000 individuals around the world — and the numbers are still growing! By harnessing this powerful medium, we want to continue creating more avenues for our youth filmmakers to advocate for mental health/dementia issues.

Register for competition here

Prizes

Best Overall Short Film: S$3000

Best Impact Short Film: S$2000

Audience Choice Award: S$1000

The 2021 Best Overall Short Film will be screened at the next Singapore Mental Health Film Festival in May 2021.

Additionally, it will be screened at the New York City Mental Health Film Festival (New York, USA) and Rendezvous with Madness Film Festival (Toronto, Canada).

Register for competition here

Entry Requirements

To qualify for this competition, the filmmaker(s) must:

  • Be between the ages of 15 — 35 years old
  • Be living in Singapore during the time of production and submission
  • Focus on at least one of the five topics:
    1. Cyber-Bullying & Trauma
    2. Life Transitions
    3. Young Caregivers
    4. Recovery
    5. Suicide Prevention
  • Register for the competition by November 30, 2020 (23:59 hour) with a film synopsis/idea of their short film *
  • Attend at least one film production workshop *
  • Attend at least two mental health/dementia workshops *
  • Submit their short film by February 22, 2021 (only on invitation basis) **

 

Individual and Team submissions are eligible. 

*Registration for the competition close on November 30, 2020 (23:59 hour).
Only selected individuals/teams who have registered for the competition will be contacted by December 7, 2020 to attend the workshops.

**Only eligible youth, who have attended the required workshops, will receive a film submission invitation email from the Festival.

Refer to our Terms & Conditions here

Mental Health Workshops

Dec 12 10:00am – 11:30am Let’s Talk About Suicide (1)
Dec 12 2:00pm – 4:00pm Transitions within Transitions
Dec 13 10:00am – 12:00pm Before you Hit Send: How Cyber-Bullying can lead to Trauma
Dec 13 1:30pm – 3:00pm Dementia – Who Cares?
Dec 19 10:00am – 11:30am Let’s Talk About Suicide (2)
Dec 19 12:30pm – 2:30pm Caring for Myself while Supporting Others

Film Production Workshops

Dec 13 4:00pm – 5:30pm Short Film Screenwriting 101
Dec 19 3:30pm – 5:30pm Discovering the Human Psychology in Documentaries 
Dec 20 1:00pm – 2:30pm Basics of Post Production

Film Submissions Details

Submissions open in early January and close on February 22, 2021 (23:59 hour).

Maximum length of short films should be no longer than 10mins (including opening and closing credits).

Participants should expect to receive further information on film submissions in December, upon completion of the workshops.

*Only eligible youth, who have attended the required workshops, will receive a film submission invitation email from the Festival.

Mental Health Workshops

Register for competition here
Let’s Talk About Suicide (1)

Samaritans of Singapore
Date: Saturday, December 12, 2020
Time: 10am – 11:30am

On average, there are at least one suicide death a day in Singapore. With a stigma associated with the topic of suicide, how then should we safely start conversations? In this session, we will share about how we can responsibly portray suicide-related themes on film and the media. Suicide being a sensitive topic by itself, it is important that we gain some insights into what leads someone to be in the state of crisis.

On average, there are at least one suicide death a day in Singapore. With a stigma associated with the topic of suicide, how then should we safely start conversations?

In this session, we will share about how we can responsibly portray suicide-related themes on film and the media. Suicide being a sensitive topic by itself, it is important that we gain some insights into what leads someone to be in the state of crisis.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Responsible media portrayal of suicide
  2. Understanding the general background about suicides in Singapore
  3. Understanding Myths about Suicide
  4. Understanding the Suicidal Mind
Let’s Talk About Suicide (2)

Samaritans of Singapore
Date: Saturday, December 19, 2020
Time: 10am – 11:30am

On average, there are at least one suicide death a day in Singapore. With a stigma associated with the topic of suicide, how then should we safely start conversations? In this session, we will share about how we can responsibly portray suicide-related themes on film and the media. Suicide being a sensitive topic by itself, it is important that we gain some insights into what leads someone to be in the state of crisis.

On average, there are at least one suicide death a day in Singapore. With a stigma associated with the topic of suicide, how then should we safely start conversations?

In this session, we will share about how we can responsibly portray suicide-related themes on film and the media. Suicide being a sensitive topic by itself, it is important that we gain some insights into what leads someone to be in the state of crisis.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Responsible media portrayal of suicide
  2. Understanding the general background about suicides in Singapore
  3. Understanding Myths about Suicide
  4. Understanding the Suicidal Mind
Dementia – Who Cares?

Project We Forgot
Date: Sunday, December 13, 2020
Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm

When the issue of dementia hits home, families are often at a loss. Emotional stress may be exacerbated by a lack of clarity of a loved one’s condition, a lack of knowledge on finding credible information, or a lack of guidance on who to speak to for support. The typical age of current caregivers of people with dementia is aged between 40 and 60. However, in the years to come, it is expected that the number of younger caregivers will increase.

Younger caregivers, defined as those aged 35 and below, face different issues as compared to their older counterparts. These younger caregivers are at the prime of their lives – students choosing to advance their studies, graduating students and young working adults who are pursuing their career aspirations – and have to make significant sacrifices such as delaying their study and career plans or starting a family.

Caring for a loved one with dementia is a 24-7 duty. It requires the constant deciphering of new and sometimes challenging behaviours exhibited by the individual they are caring for. The task of finding the right set of solutions may often seem like a never-ending process of trial and error. Sometimes, all we need as caregivers is for someone to hold our hand, and point us to the right tools, methods, services, or activities.

This session discusses the dementia and caregiving journey, the different care roles in a family circle, the impact on younger caregivers, as well as gaps and opportunities for us to create a community of support for these individuals.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Gain a deeper understanding about dementia and the caregiving journey
  2. The different care roles in a family circle
  3. The impact on younger caregivers
  4. Gaps and opportunities for us to create a community of support for these individuals
Transitions Within Transitions

Community Health Assessment Team
Date: Saturday, December 12, 2020
Time: 2pm – 4pm

How have you been #phasingit through COVID-19? Join us through an interactive 2 hour session where we discuss transitions and its relation to mental health during COVID-19. Facilitated by Youth Support Workers from CHAT, come chat with us on 12 Dec 2020. Let’s CHAT!

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Understand transitions as a psychological process
  2. Tune in to your emotions when navigating transitions
  3. Emotions may be messy but are important to embrace when #phasingit through transitions.
Caring For Myself While Supporting Others

Anglican Care Centre
Date: Saturday, December 19, 2020
Time: 12:30pm – 2:30pm

A discussion on mental health with youths, looking at how they can help themselves and others while facing stresses of life through the recovery process. A quick look at techniques used to support recovery but also recognizing when it is time to take a step back when needed.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Gain a clearer understanding about their self care style
  2. Understand how to support a peer who is going through a difficult time
Before You Hit Send: How Cyber-bullying Can Lead To Trauma

TOUCH Youth
Date: Sunday, December 13, 2020
Time: 10am – 12pm

“Are you sure the post was about you, maybe you’re reading too much into it”, “then just don’t look at their posts”, “it’s just an instastory, don’t take it too seriously”.

These are some things people say to trivialize cyber-bullying, but cyber-bullying is anything but trivial. Because it is done online, over multiple platforms, cyber-bullying can feel like it is relentless, overwhelming and inescapable to the victims. Ultimately, it can affect our mental health and even lead to trauma.

In this webinar, we will be learning about how we can deal with cyber-bullying and the potential trauma that comes from it.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. To increase participants’ knowledge in the nature of cyber bullying
  2. To increase participants’ understanding in the causes of trauma
  3. Participants will be able to know where to seek help

Film Production Workshops

Register for competition here
Short Film Scriptwriting 101

Wesley Leon Aroozoo, LASALLE College of the Arts
Date: Sunday, December 13, 2020
Time: 4:00pm – 5:30pm

Short Film Scriptwriting 101′ introduces participants to the various elements of what makes a short film script captivating, emotionally relatable and visually engaging. Participants will also be introduced to the technicalities of script formatting and the responsibilities of a scriptwriter.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Particpants will learn how to format their scripts and understand what is needed in telling an engaging story cinematically.

Discovering the Human Psychology in Documentaries

Eileen Chong, Documentary Director 
Date: Saturday, December 19, 2020
Time: 3:30pm – 5:30pm

“As a documentary filmmaker, how do you gain access to a profile?”, and “How do you then get them to share with you so deeply and candidly?”
These are the questions that I get asked most often.
The human stories in documentaries are the hardest to crack. After all, why should the profile open up their lives and share their deepest vulnerabilities with you? This workshop teaches youths to be observant with human behaviour, to listen intently to what profiles tell them, more importantly – what they don’t say. How to approach making documentaries with integrity (especially if the topic is sensitive), helps the filmmaker to discover their own psychology in making documentaries and encourages youths to challenge their perspective on life in order to broaden their horizon in the scout for stories.

Takeaways from this workshop:

  1. Importance of exploring own “psychology”
  2. Ethical Considerations in Film-making (beneficence; safeguarding interest of profiles; mutually-beneficial relationship)
  3. Engagement with Profiles and team-members
  4. What to take note of when engaging profiles – especially on topics of mental health which can be sensitive
  5. How to create an environment where profiles feel safe to share
  6. Real case studies and examples of working with your profiles
Basics of Post-Production

Yahssir M, Millenia Motion Pictures
Date: Sunday, December 20, 2020
Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm

Learn how the standards for broadcast audio levels and colour correction. Why there is a difference between different videos and what ‘rules’ do they follow.

Takeaways from this workshop:

To be able to understand that there are broadcasting standards for video and why there are a common set of standards to follow in terms of audio and colour.

General topics covered will include:

  1. Software (paid and free)
  2. Footage ingesting
  3. Jump cuts/ 180 degrees rule / focusing on action
  4. Colour correction
  5. Filters
  6. Audio recording
  7. Audio levels and microphone positions
  8. Clipping audio
  9. Exportation for web and screening
  10. Sending final files

Singapore Mental Health Film Festival

Singapore Mental Health Film Festival Limited (SMHFF) is a Singapore-based and registered non-profit organisation. 

SMHFF’s vision is to provide an inclusive and safe platform for stories about recovery and resilience.

Safe Space

SMHFF is committed to providing an open and safe space where we welcome people of all backgrounds and abilities to participate in empowering, non-judgemental and non-threatening discussions. This also means that we commit to respecting the privacy of others by maintaining confidentiality and allowing others to speak for themselves.

Sponsors

Jardine Matheson is a diversified Asian-based group with unsurpassed experience in the region, having been founded in China in 1832. The Group comprise a broad portfolio of market-leading businesses, which represent a combination of cash generating activities and long-term property assets that are closely aligned to the increasingly prosperous consumers of the region. Group companies in Singapore include: Jardine Cycle & Carriage; Cycle & Carriage Singapore, Jardine Engineering Corporation;  Schindler Lifts (Singapore); Gammon Construction; Hongkong Land; MCL Land; Mandarin Oriental, Singapore; Dairy Farm Singapore (Cold Storage; Giant; Guardian Health & Beauty; and 7-Eleven); Maxim’s Catering Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong; Genki Sushi Singapore; and Starbucks Singapore.

MINDSET Care Limited (MINDSET) is a registered charity established by the Jardine Matheson Group of companies to make a tangible difference in the area of mental health. Led by Jardine Ambassadors, MINDSET aims to raise awareness and understanding of mental health issues to change attitudes, while at the same time, provide practical support to individuals, families and charitable initiatives in the mental health sector. MINDSET was awarded the Charity Governance Award 2018 and Charity Transparency Awards 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 by the Charity Council. MINDSET is also named a Champion of Good by the National Volunteer & Philanthropy Centre.

Supported By

National Youth Council (NYC) is the national body for youth development in Singapore and the focal point of international youth affairs.

At NYC, we believe in a world where young people are respected and heard, and have the ability to influence and make a difference to the world. Together with our partners, we develop future-ready youth who are committed to Singapore by instilling in them a heart for service, resilience and an enterprising spirit.

FAQs

What are the Terms and Conditions of this Competition?

Please refer to: bit.ly/SMHFF_SFYC2021_TnCsDec220 for the full SMHFF Short Film Youth Competition terms and conditions.

Would there be a budget allocated for each team if the proposed idea is selected for production?

There is no budget allocated. Each individual or teams who are keen to participate in this competition will need to look for their resources in terms of producing the film, hiring of actors and other logistic that the individual/ group think they may require.

I didn’t receive an acknowledgement email after registering. Did the Festival receive my application?

Currently, the registration platform doesn’t allow us to send acknowledgement emails. However, if you got to the final page that informs you that we have received your application and you’ll be contacted by Dec 7, we have received it!

Will the Festival be screening our films outside of the Premiere?

There might be a possibility that the Festival will utilise your film for outreach efforts, on both online and physical events. Additionally, the Festival might invite you as a speaker to share your experience on creating a film for the competition.

What films will be screened during the SMHFF Short Film Youth Competition Premiere in April/May?

Only the top 10 finalists’ films will be screened during the Premiere. However, films submitted into this competition should not be screened or submitted to other platforms or festivals prior to the Premiere. 

Are we commissioned to create the film?

Yes. Because each film has to focus on at least one of the five mental health/dementia topics, it should be created for the Competition.  Alongside the film creation, we hope that the reason behind their entry is geared towards bringing a greater sense of awareness towards the topic of mental health/ dementia.

Winning films for the 2021 competition will be awarded cash prizes as well as the chance to be screened overseas at another two other film festivals. But we hope that you can see that as an encouragement and token for your efforts because the larger goal of the festival is really to get people thinking and having conversations about mental health/dementia.

For more information about the competition visit: https://bit.ly/SMHFF_YouthCompetition2021

Can I be a team member of two different groups that have sent two different proposals for the application process?

No. All participants will only be allowed one registration application, either as an individual or as part of a group.

Does an individual submission mean I must do everything myself?

Individual means you don’t work with a group to conceptualise and execute the idea. You can work with actors but if they aren’t the ones who helped in the conceptualisation and execution of the proposal, then they’re not considered part of the team.

For the workshops, must everyone in the team attend?

Yes, every participant from the Team is required to attend. However, due to the overwhelming entries this year, Teams with 5 and more members will be issued only TWO Zoom logins. Individuals and Teams with 4 and less members will be issued only ONE Zoom login. Hence, Teams would need to find a safe space(s) for members to use one/two devices to enter the workshops.

Where would the workshops be held?

In light of the pandemic, workshops will all be held online via Zoom. Selected participants will be given the Zoom links of their chosen sessions by December 7, 2020.

Can I submit a film that has already been created?

Films created should be geared towards the topics selected for the competition year of the Singapore Mental Health Film Festival Youth Competition. 

The 2021 Youth Competition topics are: 

  1. Cyber-Bullying & Trauma
  2. Life Transitions
  3. Young Caregivers
  4. Recovery
  5. Suicide Prevention

Films submitted should not have been screened or submitted to other platforms or festivals prior to SMHFF Youth Competition Premiere, which usually happens annually in April/May.

Are animated films allowed?

Yes, they are.

Is there a maximum number of persons for team submissions?

Yes, the team size should not exceed more than 10 persons.

Who will be contacted on December 7, 2020?

Only eligible individuals/groups who have registered for the competition will be contacted by December 7, 2020. 

Register for the competition here.

What do you mean by eligible?

Because we want to create the best learning and fair environment for all youths who are interested to submit a film to the festival, they will need to submit a synopsis or idea.

The reason for that is also because the selection basis for the competition is largely based on a synopsis or idea that they have. Hence we would really love to give opportunities to the ones who have given some thought about what is it about the topic of mental health that they want to talk about and how they can translate that message into film. 

Ask us a question!

If your question that hasn’t been answered in the FAQs, please send us a message!

youth@smhff.com